Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Alaska State Library Archiving Governor Palin’s End of Term Website

July 28, 2009

The Alaska State Library’s collection Alaska Governor/Lt. Governor Web Sites was originally conceived to archive these government websites over time. Alaska Governor Sarah Palin’s resignation announcement earlier this month and the transition of power to Lieutenant Governor Sean Parnell this past Sunday, July 26, 2009 gave the Alaska State Library a great chance to use the crawl on demand feature of Archive-It to preserve information on the announcement and the end of Governor Palin’s term.

By crawling Governor Palin and Lt. Governor Parnell’s websites on the eve of the transition of power, the Alaska State Library was able to capture information that is now offline.  Once Sarah Palin left office, the governor’s website changed to reflect Sean Parnell as governor, and the lieutenant governor’s website changed to reflect Craig Campbell as lieutenant governor. The information from former Governor Palin’s website as well as speeches and press releases from Sean Parnell’s time as lieutenant governor are no longer available on the live web. The foresight of the staff of the Alaska State Library and on-demand crawling through Archive-It made it possible to preserve the final changes to these websites before they were taken offline.

Join the K-12 Web Archiving Program!

July 22, 2009

 

Apply to be part of the Internet Archive K-12 program, and your school can help to capture and archive today’s primary source materials on the Web. 

A growing number of individuals and institutions recognize the importance of archiving and preserving the often transitory digital cultural artifacts that are distributed over the Web. But so far, the vast majority of decisions about what Web sites will live into the future have been made by adults, and reflect adults’ sensibilities about what constitutes the important records of history. We want and need to hear from students. 

The Internet Archive, the Library of Congress and California Digital Library collaborated on a pilot in the spring of 2008 and a full-year program for the 2008/2009 school year, working with a total of 10 elementary, middle and high schools. We are looking to expand this program to new schools in the coming year. You can explore the collections created during the 2008/2009 school year on the Archive-It website at: http://www.archive-it.org/k12/

Find a complete project description and the brief application here: http://www.loc.gov/teachers/newsevents/news/  Apply by August 14 for full consideration.

 

 <a href=’http://www.loc.gov/teachers/’>Apply</a&gt; to be part of the Internet Archive K-12 program, and your school can help to capture and archive today’s primary source materials on the Web. 
<br><br>
A growing number of individuals and institutions recognize the importance of archiving and preserving the often transitory digital cultural artifacts that are distributed over the Web. But so far, the vast majority of decisions about what Web sites will live into the future have been made by adults, and reflect adults’ sensibilities about what constitutes the important records of history. We want and need to hear from students. 
<br><br>
The Internet Archive, the Library of Congress and California Digital Library collaborated on a pilot in the spring of 2008 and a full-year program for the 2008/2009 school year, working with a total of 10 elementary, middle and high schools. We are looking to expand this program to new schools in the coming year. You can explore the collections created during the 2008/2009 school year on the <a href=’http://www.archive-it.org’>Archive-It</a&gt; website at: http://www.archive-it.org/k12/. 
<br><br>
Find a complete project description and the brief application in the “Featured Resources” section at http://www.loc.gov/teachers/. Apply by <b>August 14</b> for full consideration.
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Searching the dawn of the 21st Century

October 7, 2008

What was the web of the past really like?

Last Tuesday, Google unveiled a unique new web search, 2001 Google, as part of their 10th birthday celebration.

Using an actual archived version of their search engine index from January 2001, the service answers queries more-or-less how Google did back then — same results, same ranking, same summary ‘snippets’.

But of course, many of those result pages have changed or disappeared entirely since then — and that’s where the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine comes in. For many of the 2001 search results, the best or only view comes from the Wayback Machine, which Google has helpfully provided in lieu of the usual ‘cached version’ links.

The combination of authentic Google search and the Wayback’s giant web archive is more powerful than either alone: finding needles lost in the Wayback haystack, showing actual prior rankings/popularity of pages for real queries, and highlighting material that would have been lost forever without purposeful public-interest archiving.

We thank Google for this chance to work together and highlight our web archive. Google plans to leave the 2001 search up for one month, and we’ll talk more about what we’ve learned from this service in a future blog post.

In the meantime, try the 2001 Google Search!